Droopy Hydrangea?

Is your hydrangea droopy?  Are the flower heads kissing the ground?  I will tell you this… The majority of the time it isn’t about the lack of water and most likely you are over watering thinking it will help perk up those lovely hydrangea heads.  What is really going on is the fact that the hydrangea blossoms are too heavy for the young pliable stems of your plant.   Over time your hydrangea will age (as we all do) and become a stronger version of our younger self- able to carry heavy loads under added stress.   What I am trying to say in the garden world-  the stems over time will become woody and stronger, allowing the stems to hold up the heavy flower heads.   So, give the plant some time to mature and grow.

In the duration, you could always stake up a few of the stems to make the plant more presentable.

July_2017 Thirsty Thursday Cocktails

I LOVE the summer heat and a cool refreshing cocktail.  What says cool more than a cucumber?  Certainly not the back side of your pillow!  Yes, cucumber is the theme this month along with crisp soda water, lemonade and my favorite; lemongrass.  Here are the recipes for Thirsty Thursday :

Siam Sip
2 shots Hendrick’s Gin
1 Large handful of ice cubes, plus more for each glass
8-10 large leaves of Thai basil cut into chiffonade, plus two stems for garnish
12-14 slices of English/Persian cucumbers (8 for shaker)
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 can San Pellegrino orange soda
Add a handful of ice, gin, basil chiffonade, 8 slices of cucumber, and lemon juice to a shaker. Shake vigorously.
Add a few cubes of ice to two glasses. Pour half of the San Pellegrino into each glass, and top with half the icy strained goodness from the shaker. Garnish with a sprig of thai basil and a few slices of cucumber. Admire, then stir, sip, and be cooled! Continue reading “July_2017 Thirsty Thursday Cocktails”

Rules of Container Gardening

-There are no rules!  kinda, sorta, well a couple…

When it comes to container gardening and rules I usually say, “rules schmoolz!  You do what you want.”   Well, that is not entirely true.  Just as in life there are rules, guidelines if you will.   Always use your directional when making a turn,  look both ways when you cross the street, do not eat yellow snow.  Blah, blah, blah…  So as in life, here are a couple rules to follow to keep you on the straight and narrow:

  1.  Choose the right plant for the right sun condition.  I will never let you choose a plant that needs shade for you to put it in the sun so that it can fry and turn crispy.  Same goes for a plant that loves the sun and you want to plant it in the shade.  That poor little baby will go limp and never flower for you.
  2. Choose plants that compliment each other.   Those plants that are drought tolerant and can go days without water like a camel should not be planted with someone who likes a cool drink everyday.
  3. Adhere to the rule of height.  Do not plant someone that only gets 8 inches behind someone that gets 18inches.  You’ll never see it!

That’s it!   As far as color goes-  YOU DO FOR YOU!   You aren’t planting to make your daughter or your neighbor or your mommy happy.  At the end of the day it is you that has to come home to your planters.  When you pull up into your driveway and see your window boxes, containers or flower beds you want to smile, not feel deflated.   If you want to put pink and red together- GO AHEAD!  If you want to plant all foliage, if you want to put red and yellow together- GO AHEAD.   At the end of the day, its all about YOU!

April Thirsty Thursday Recipes

Join us this Thursday night, April 20th from 5:30-7pm. We will showcase seasonal cocktails made from the plants you grow in your own garden. We will demonstrate how to use your garden harvest to create tasty, refreshing, praise worthy cocktails  to share with your friends, neighbors and family- From Garden to Glass! Everything from herbs, veggies, berries, shrubs and flowers.  We highlight what is in season now or what will be coming into season very shortly.  This Thursday we will be showcasing mint, rhubarb and strawberries.

Mint Ginger Lemonade
Ingredients:
Mint Ginger Simple Syrup:
3/4 cup sugar
3/4 cup water
1/2 cup packed mint leaves, torn
1-inch piece of fresh ginger, diced

Lemonade:
3 cups cold water
3/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (roughly 6-7 large lemons)
batch of mint ginger simple syrup (see recipe above)
fresh mint
1 lemon, sliced thinly

Directions:
Prepare Simple Syrup:
Combine all of the simple syrup ingredients in a small saucepan.
Bring to a low simmer, and stir until the sugar has dissolved completely.
Boil and simmer the syrup for an additional 1-2 minutes. Remove and place in a heatproof bowl. Allow to come temperature, or alternative cover and allow to infuse in the fridge for at least 30 to 45 minutes or overnight (for a more intensely flavored lemonade).
Once chilled, strain simple syrup through a fine-mesh sieve. Discard the mint leaves and ginger pieces.

Make Lemonade:
In a large pitcher, combine the water, lemon juice, and a full batch of mint ginger simple syrup. Stir well.
Add fresh mint and sliced lemon slices to the pitcher as desired. Chill.
Serve lemonade chilled or alternatively, over homemade mint ice cubes (simply add fresh mint leaves to your ice cube tray–optional). Continue reading “April Thirsty Thursday Recipes”

Time to Lime

Lime, Lime, Lime

We feel that lime is absolutely the most important step in having a thick, green, disease resistant, weed free lawn. So many people come to Scenic Roots and ask how much lime they need for X amount of lawn, but then proceed to buy less than half of what we recommend. We understand when we tell you you need 10 bags of lime for 10,000 sqft., you may get sticker shock. WE do not mean to break your bank, but buying an inadequate amount of lime is wasting your time and money. Not only on the lime, but on any grass seed and fertilizer you buy throughout the year. We say this because without the proper pH the grass seed will not establish very well and the fertilizer will not give you the desired outcome. Without the proper pH level, weeds will take over, moss will grow, bare spots will be a problem, and disease will be more apt to occur. The best way to fight all this is to have the proper pH level. The #1 key to that is proper liming!

Limestone aka lime is a white/grayish mineral compound used to combat acidity and to supply calcium for plant growth. The rate of application is 40lb per 1,000 sqft. Each application raises your pH level by .5 Therefor several different applications might be needed for your proper pH.