Beans

It is time to start thinking about which bean varieties you want to grow in your garden. Sowing time is after the average last spring frost. Beans are one of those vegetables that are easy and fun to grow. The largest selection of beans are bush types which produce their entire crop over a period of a couple of weeks – sow bush beans every two to three weeks in order to keep a steady supply on the table! Even though needing support, pole beans produce continually until the first fall frost. Beans can be frozen for later use. Our friends at Botanical Interests offer many of only the best bean varieties for your garden. The owners would like to share three of their favorites with you!

Bean Bush Jade: This 60-day bean has been a favorite since first introduced for its consistent long, straight, stringless pods that are tender and sweet with a beautiful, very dark green color. Upright, bushy plants hold the pods high so they don’t curl or have tip rot. In addition to being very productive, plants have good disease resistance to common bean mosaic viruses and are tolerant to rust.

Bean Bush Contender: This 50-day bean was recommended by a garden center customer when he was servicing a display. After testing them, Botanical Interests was sold! The flavor is excellent either cooked or eaten raw, and the plants tolerate heat and mildew better than other varieties (most beans won’t produce over 90ºF).

Bean Pole Yard Long Orient Wonder: This 80 day bean is known in the Orient as “dau gok”.Orient Wonder is a delicious and beautiful dark green pole bean. Seeds are slow to develop, so pods stay smooth and slender. Orient Wonder is of sub-tropical origin, but is better suited than other varieties for gardens in the U.S. It’s easy to grow, and almost indestructible. Beans are best harvested 12″ to 18″ long, even though they can grow as long as 30″.

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